Why Is The Delaware Attorney General’s Office Protecting Patrick Miller And The Sussex Tech Bandits?

A shocking email from an Indian River board member highlights the vast amount of corruption and scandal coming from the highest levels of the state when it comes to Patrick Miller.  We are all wondering how the current President of the Board at Indian River Volunteer Fire Company is still walking around free.

Last week, I reported how citizen Billie Jo Bullock emailed the entire board down in Indian River.  She got three responses back.

Good morning Billie Jo,

We at no time have given the message that it was ok what was done by Mr. Miller.  The school board and the district administration has always been adamant regarding our stance desiring the State of Delaware take appropriate actions.  From day one we, and quite frankly law enforcement agencies, have felt there was sufficient information for the AG office in Delaware to proceed.

Why the AG office has not is a mystery to all.  Quite frankly they have shown themselves to be weak and unresponsive to State employees discrepancies.   Not only did they not pursue Mr. Miller, which involved about $83,000 in “Questionable” spending found by the State auditor, but they did not pursue the administrative officials at Sussex Tech when not long ago were found to have misappropriated funds for land acquisitions, State work contracts, etc…  And that was millions of dollars involved.   Next time you see your State Senator and Representatives it would be good to ask them these questions.  None of them seem to have the guts to pursue.

As to your original question, the answer is simple.  The school district is a State entity and as such we have NO power to file charges against and employee whether it be criminal or civil. The school district is not treated the same as an individual would be who has been wronged and has individual rights.  The District has no such rights or powers as determined by the State of Delaware.    Would it be nice that we could?  Yes it would, but we don’t even have the option.  All we can do is hand over information to the State and have them proceed.

Please keep in mind it was the school district and school board who initiated the investigation and ASKED the state auditor’s office to conduct an audit.  WE asked for it.

Also, the State conducts and audit on all school districts annually and it’s frustrating that at no time during any prior years audits they uncovered any wrong doing.  How’s that for reliability… We rely on them to help us keep financials reviewed.

In the auditor’s report their findings resulted in “questionable” spending… in their words. They did not determine anything to be of a criminal nature.  That is probably why the AG office has not pursued.

I hope this helps answer your questions and I hope you continue your support of the Indian River School District.

Jim Fritz
IRSD School Board

This is fascinating.  We have a sitting member of their board wondering why the hell our Attorney General’s office let Patrick Miller slide through the cracks.  This just shows our corrupt Delaware is.

Board member Dr. Heather Statler sent a response to Bullock but it was weak in comparison to Fritz’ reply.  Very cookie-cutter.

Good evening. 

I understand your concerns and appreciate your correspondence. I am deeply committed to strengthening our schools and providing our students with the best educational experience. 

I will ask Superintendent Steele to communicate with you regarding this matter. He can update you on the district’s perspective/options at this point (within the legal limitations under which he is permitted to do so). 

Thank you for being passionate about our students, families, and community.

Respectfully,
Dr. Statler
What the heck was that?  I would rather not even get a response than get that malarkey.
Donald Hattier’s response was even better!
Evening.
The way the state is structured, it is not our call to sue.  That is theirs.  I speak for myself but suspect we all feel the way you do.
My guess is they did a calculation of legal expenses involved and likelihood of conviction, not to mention reimbursement, and decided it wasn’t worth it.  Same for the audit.
It was years ago that Senator Edward E. Dirkenson in Washington said, “a million here, a million there, and pretty soon your talking serious money.”  And that was in the 60’s.
Government, you gotta love it.
These are my personal feelings and in no way represent the district. 
Keep in mind that the state only sued so far for the reimbursement of the firehouse embezzlement and there have been multiple of those in the last five years.
I am rather cynical about these things.  Regrettably, it is not our call.
Donald G. Hattier DC
So Hattier thinks the state decided it wasn’t worth it because of expense.  I pretty much guarantee that if I walked into a WaWa right now and opened a cash register and took a few hundred bucks, I would get arrested.  I would go to jail and go to court.  I would be found guilty and I would go to prison.  For a while at least.  All that would cost taxpayers a hefty sum but the time I got out.  Is Hattier really saying why bother going after white-collar criminals cause it costs too much?  That is just condoning what Miller did and tells every school thief wannabe it is ok.
Lest we forget, the AG’s office in Delaware STOPPED the Indian River audit investigation final report from coming out months before it did.  Something stinks to high heaven here and this blogger will not stop until he gets to the bottom of it.  And Fritz is right.  We let the Sussex Tech guys off too.  Meanwhile, our prisons are so full we have to ship prisoners out of state at a cost of $40,000 a day.  Delaware, the first to sign the Constitution, the last to follow it.
We know Susan Bunting knew about Miller’s theft going back a decade.  How many of the long-standing board members knew?  Miller is good but he wasn’t that good.  How many of them stood by and watched it happen?  I figured Leolga Wright wouldn’t respond to Bullock.  She was knee-deep with Miller over at the fire company.  Bireley wouldn’t respond to her either.  He did the audits for the fire company for many years.  What was the reason Indian River School District reported Miller?  Not we suspected, but what they found that finally brought the state auditors in?  And why, in the name of all that is holy, is the Attorney General’s office protecting this scumbag?  Matt Denn- we deserve answers.
Fritz recommended Bullock contact our legislators.  Aside from the bill regarding charter school audits, no legislation has come out addressing the very glaring holes in our state code when it comes to white-collar theft of education dollars.  It is something any legislator could do and the public support for it would, and should be, overwhelming.  What is stopping them?  They all know about these things going on.  It is time for them to actually rip apart state code and find the holes and patch them up.  It is disgusting that I even have to write about this stuff.  But if no one at a state level can be a watchdog, here I am.

3 thoughts on “Why Is The Delaware Attorney General’s Office Protecting Patrick Miller And The Sussex Tech Bandits?

  1. According to the Delaware Attorney Generals office these board members are misinformed. A story in the Coastal Point in 2017 proves this claim: To Wit:
    IRSD could pursue civil lawsuit

    Aside from possible criminal charges, when it comes to civil lawsuits, “Individual school districts retain their own legal counsel, so they are not represented by the DOJ,” according to DOJ spokesperson Carl Kanefsky. “However, there is nothing that would keep them from bringing civil action against a person.”

    But there are some issues that have kept the district from moving ahead with a lawsuit thus far.

    To begin with, as a plaintiff, the IRSD and its legal team would bear the brunt of leading a potential lawsuit and persuading a judge of their case.

    “The district hasn’t made a decision one way of the other … because it is waiting for all the processes to conclude,” said IRSD attorney David Williams of Morris James LLP. “The district wants to make an informed, intelligent decision about what course of action to take. It really isn’t in a position to do so that this point.”

    Yes, the IRSD could theoretically pursue civil suit. But district officials say now is not the time.

    The IRSD would benefit from waiting for the AG’s Office to complete its work, for several reasons. If the AG prosecutes and secures a “guilty” plea or verdict, then the sentencing would likely include jail time and/or restitution. In that case, justice would be considered served, and there would be no reason to pursue civil action. Additionally, attorney fees are expensive and the IRSD could save money by not bringing its own suit, if it can be avoided.

    “I personally don’t think the timing is appropriate,” Williams said. “The district is waiting to see what the outcome of all that is, and then it’ll make a more informed, intelligent decision.”

    Civil suits would be appropriate next steps in a situation in which the AG fails to prosecute, so the employer would have to prove theft in a civil case in order to get restitution.

    “The district gets frustrated it takes the auditor as long as it does,” Williams said. “We would all like to see this thing

    Like

    • IRSD can file civil suit…To Wit:
      IRSD could pursue civil lawsuit

      Aside from possible criminal charges, when it comes to civil lawsuits, “Individual school districts retain their own legal counsel, so they are not represented by the DOJ,” according to DOJ spokesperson Carl Kanefsky. “However, there is nothing that would keep them from bringing civil action against a person.”

      But there are some issues that have kept the district from moving ahead with a lawsuit thus far.

      To begin with, as a plaintiff, the IRSD and its legal team would bear the brunt of leading a potential lawsuit and persuading a judge of their case.

      “The district hasn’t made a decision one way of the other … because it is waiting for all the processes to conclude,” said IRSD attorney David Williams of Morris James LLP. “The district wants to make an informed, intelligent decision about what course of action to take. It really isn’t in a position to do so that this point.”

      Yes, the IRSD could theoretically pursue civil suit. But district officials say now is not the time.

      The IRSD would benefit from waiting for the AG’s Office to complete its work, for several reasons. If the AG prosecutes and secures a “guilty” plea or verdict, then the sentencing would likely include jail time and/or restitution. In that case, justice would be considered served, and there would be no reason to pursue civil action. Additionally, attorney fees are expensive and the IRSD could save money by not bringing its own suit, if it can be avoided.

      “I personally don’t think the timing is appropriate,” Williams said. “The district is waiting to see what the outcome of all that is, and then it’ll make a more informed, intelligent decision.”

      Civil suits would be appropriate next steps in a situation in which the AG fails to prosecute, so the employer would have to prove theft in a civil case in order to get restitution.

      “The district gets frustrated it takes the auditor as long as it does,” Williams said. “We would all like to see this thing
      IRSD could pursue civil lawsuit

      Aside from possible criminal charges, when it comes to civil lawsuits, “Individual school districts retain their own legal counsel, so they are not represented by the DOJ,” according to DOJ spokesperson Carl Kanefsky. “However, there is nothing that would keep them from bringing civil action against a person.”

      But there are some issues that have kept the district from moving ahead with a lawsuit thus far.

      To begin with, as a plaintiff, the IRSD and its legal team would bear the brunt of leading a potential lawsuit and persuading a judge of their case.

      “The district hasn’t made a decision one way of the other … because it is waiting for all the processes to conclude,” said IRSD attorney David Williams of Morris James LLP. “The district wants to make an informed, intelligent decision about what course of action to take. It really isn’t in a position to do so that this point.”

      Yes, the IRSD could theoretically pursue civil suit. But district officials say now is not the time.

      The IRSD would benefit from waiting for the AG’s Office to complete its work, for several reasons. If the AG prosecutes and secures a “guilty” plea or verdict, then the sentencing would likely include jail time and/or restitution. In that case, justice would be considered served, and there would be no reason to pursue civil action. Additionally, attorney fees are expensive and the IRSD could save money by not bringing its own suit, if it can be avoided.

      “I personally don’t think the timing is appropriate,” Williams said. “The district is waiting to see what the outcome of all that is, and then it’ll make a more informed, intelligent decision.”

      Civil suits would be appropriate next steps in a situation in which the AG fails to prosecute, so the employer would have to prove theft in a civil case in order to get restitution.

      “The district gets frustrated it takes the auditor as long as it does,” Williams said. “We would all like to see this thing
      IRSD could pursue civil lawsuit

      Aside from possible criminal charges, when it comes to civil lawsuits, “Individual school districts retain their own legal counsel, so they are not represented by the DOJ,” according to DOJ spokesperson Carl Kanefsky. “However, there is nothing that would keep them from bringing civil action against a person.”

      But there are some issues that have kept the district from moving ahead with a lawsuit thus far.

      To begin with, as a plaintiff, the IRSD and its legal team would bear the brunt of leading a potential lawsuit and persuading a judge of their case.

      “The district hasn’t made a decision one way of the other … because it is waiting for all the processes to conclude,” said IRSD attorney David Williams of Morris James LLP. “The district wants to make an informed, intelligent decision about what course of action to take. It really isn’t in a position to do so that this point.”

      Yes, the IRSD could theoretically pursue civil suit. But district officials say now is not the time.

      The IRSD would benefit from waiting for the AG’s Office to complete its work, for several reasons. If the AG prosecutes and secures a “guilty” plea or verdict, then the sentencing would likely include jail time and/or restitution. In that case, justice would be considered served, and there would be no reason to pursue civil action. Additionally, attorney fees are expensive and the IRSD could save money by not bringing its own suit, if it can be avoided.

      “I personally don’t think the timing is appropriate,” Williams said. “The district is waiting to see what the outcome of all that is, and then it’ll make a more informed, intelligent decision.”

      Civil suits would be appropriate next steps in a situation in which the AG fails to prosecute, so the employer would have to prove theft in a civil case in order to get restitution.

      “The district gets frustrated it takes the auditor as long as it does,” Williams said. “We would all like to see this thing
      v

      Like

  2. Matthews wrote some dumb and offensive shit a decade ago that didn’t represent his work of the last few years. He takes his lumps, resigns, and loses his income.

    Bunting is complicit in this thievery of taxpayer dollars and continues to deflect and not answer for her leadership failure. She stays in her job.

    And it gets better: Bunting has the gall to try and take Matthews teaching license. Talk about beating a guy when he’s down.

    Can we just trade Matthews for Bunting and call it a day?

    Like

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