Even If Governor Markell Vetoes House Bill 50, The General Assembly Could Override The Veto

Governor Markell announced today he would veto House Bill 50 if it is passed by the Delaware House and Senate and comes to his desk.  However, in Delaware law, it could be overturned by the Delaware General Assembly.  Here’s how, taken from the Delaware Constitution:

§ 18 Approval or veto of bills, orders, resolutions or votes; repassage over veto.

Section 18. Every bill which shall have passed both Houses of the General Assembly shall, before it becomes law, be presented to the Governor; if he or she approves, he or she shall sign it; but if he or she shall not approve, he or she shall return it with his or her objections to the House in which it shall have originated, which House shall enter the objections at large on the journal and proceed to reconsider it. If, after such reconsideration, three-fifths of all the members elected to that House shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent together with the objections to the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by three-fifths of all the members elected to that House, it shall become a law; but in neither House shall the vote be taken on the day on which the bill shall be returned to it. In all such cases the votes of both Houses shall be determined by yeas and nays, and the names of the members voting for and against the bill shall be entered on the journal of each House respectively. If any bill shall not be returned by the Governor within ten days, Sundays excepted, after it shall have been presented to him or her, the same shall be a law in like manner as if he or she had signed it, unless the General Assembly shall, by final adjournment, prevent its return, in which case it shall not become a law without the approval of the Governor.

For purposes of return of Bills not approved by the Governor the General Assembly shall be considered to be continuously in Session until final adjournment and the Clerk of the House of Representatives and the Secretary of the Senate shall be deemed proper recipients of such returned bills during recess or adjournment of the General Assembly other than final adjournment.

No bill shall become a law after the final adjournment of the General Assembly, unless approved by the Governor within thirty days after such adjournment. The Governor shall have power to disapprove of any item or items of any bill making appropriations of money, embracing distinct items, and the part or parts of the bill approved shall be the law, and the item or items of appropriation disapproved shall be void, unless repassed according to the rules and limitations prescribed for the passage of other bills, over the Executive veto. Every order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence of both Houses of the General Assembly may be necessary, except on a question of adjournment, shall be presented to the Governor, and before the same shall take effect be approved by him or her, or being disapproved by him or her, shall be repassed by three-fifths of all the members elected to each House of the General Assembly, according to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case of a bill. Every order and resolution to which the concurrence of both Houses of the General Assembly may be necessary, except on a question of adjournment and those matters dealing solely with the internal or administrative affairs of the General Assembly, shall be presented to the Governor, and before the same shall take effect be approved by him or her, or being disapproved by him or her, shall be repassed by three-fifths of all the members elected to each House of the General Assembly, according to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case of a bill.

In a nutshell, if House Bill 50 gets to the point where Markell vetoes the legislation, the House of Representatives (who originated the bill) would record Markell’s objection, and if they decided to revote on it, and if 3/5 of the House says yes (25 out of the 41), it would then go to the Senate.  They would vote, and if 3/5 of the Senate says yes (13 out of 21), it would become law.

So this means everyone needs to call, email, post on their elected officials Facebook, Twitter and any other social media they have, and publicly and loudly request their support for House Bill 50.  I will be posting information that will make this very easy for everyone shortly.

Delaware PTA Hits A Home Run For The Priority Schools!

The Delaware PTA has released a message indicating it is in agreement with the iPetition several hundred people have already signed in regards to the six Delaware priority schools.  This is a great endorsement by this organization, and many people will be very impressed with them, including this writer!

Happy New Year PTA families,

We wanted to take a moment and reach out to you regarding the petition that is currently circulating online regarding the 6 identified Priority Schools. The petition rejects certain elements of the Delaware Department of Education’s Priority Schools Plan. Delaware PTA DOES SUPPORT the petition, and we are asking for your support as well. If you have not already done so, you can sign the petition using the following link http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/lets-make-priority-schools-a-real-priority-2

Delaware PTA has identified the following three primary areas of concern with the current memorandum of understanding between the Delaware Department of Education, Christina School District and Red Clay Consolidated School District:

  1.       The proposed MOU from the DDOE does not provide the necessary funding to adequately and effectively support the districts in their efforts to address the needs of the identified Priority Schools.
  2.       The proposed MOU does not address the sustainability of any progress the schools make. We believe the MOU should clearly outline how the changes will be sustained beyond the turnaround time frame.
  3.       Although the Delaware Department of Education has extended the timeline for the Christina School Board to submit its Priority Schools plans, we believe the time frame for submission should be such that each district has adequate time to develop robust, comprehensive plans. In addition, the time frame should allow sufficient time for parents and other stakeholders to become informed and offer thoughtful input with the level of depth and breadth necessary under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).

Regardless of whether or not you reside in the impacted districts or have students attending one of the identified schools, your support is critical, as the outcomes of this Priority Schools process has larger implications for all public schools in Delaware and their ability to make decisions that best meet the needs of their community.  We have had conversations with both school districts and the Delaware Department of Education, and offered possible solutions. We look forward to working with and supporting the districts, schools and parents on developing and implementing an effective plan.

 Thank you for all that you do

Delaware PTA

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