Rep. Virginia Foxx Blows Smoke About Success Academy During National Charter Schools Week

The following press release was just sent out by the U.S. Education and the Workforce Committee regarding National Charter Schools Week.  U.S. Rep. Virginia Foxx, a Republican from North Carolina and also the Chairwoman of the Committee, praises Eva Moskowitz and  Success Academy as if they were the greatest schools on the planet.  I would love to see these 15 out of 16 “independent studies” that state charter schools outperform traditional school districts.  If they are anything like certain Delaware charter schools, that statement is false when you look at the demographics of those schools with students with disabilities, minority students, ELL students and low-income students at much lower percentages than those charter schools.

This is what happens when corporations want to privatize education.  Smoke and mirrors at the highest levels!  We should all get down our knees and bow to the almighty charter school empire as the savior of education.  With discrimination lawsuits against Success Academy piling up over the past decade, I would not use this McCharter chain as a shining beacon of anything.

Charter Schools: Providing Hope and Opportunity

Parents should determine which school is best for their children — not zip codes. With the rise of charter schools across the country, more students are able to escape underperforming schools and receive the high-quality education they deserve. In fact, the success and popularity of the charter school movement during the last 25 years is truly remarkable.

  • What started as one school in Minnesota has grown to nearly 7,000 charter schools located across the country.
  • More than three million students are enrolled in a charter school today.
  • 15 out of 16 independent studies found that charter school students perform better academically than their district school peers.
  • More than 1 million student names are on charter school waiting lists, waiting for the opportunity to receive a great education.

To commemorate National Charter Schools Week — and the hope and opportunity charter schools provide — Rep. Virginia Foxx (R-NC), chair of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, spoke about her recent visit to a charter school that’s successfully serving the children of Harlem in New York City:

Mr. Speaker, as we celebrate National Charter Schools Week, I want to highlight my recent visit to Success Academy Harlem 1 — 1 of 41 charter schools in the largest and highest performing public charter school network in New York City.

Success Academy currently serves 14,000 students and has more than 16,000 families on its waitlist. Founded in 2006, Harlem 1 is Success Academy’s first school and founder Eva Moskowitz served as its first principal.

With a focus on developing the whole child, Success Academy aims to make its schools joyful places of learning and I’m here to tell you these schools are getting results and they are joyful. Five of the top five schools in the state of New York in math and two of the top five schools in English are Success Academy schools.

Every student in every school deserves an excellent education. But unfortunately we are falling far short of that goal as a nation.  Thankfully, innovative charter schools like Success Academy Harlem 1 are providing thousands of families with new hope and opportunity.

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Members Of U.S. Senate & Congress Tell John King To Kill Supplement Not Supplant Regulation!

Today, twenty-five Republicans in both the U.S. Senate and House Education committees told U.S. Secretary of Education to kill the “supplement not supplant” regulation that has drawn the ire of the majority of the teaching profession in America.  In a nutshell, this regulation would completely change the way Title I funds are disbursed to schools, would cause severe damage to the teaching profession, and would grant Title I funds to schools that are not Title I schools.  I wish some Democrat members of these committees would speak up!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Press Office
November 7, 2016 (202) 226-9440
25 Senate, House Education Committee Members: Education Department Should Withdraw Rule That Violates “the Unambiguously Expressed
Intent of Congress”
Proposed “supplement not supplant” regulation could harm
students, schools, and teachers


WASHINGTON, D.C. –
Twenty-five Republican members of the Senate and House education committees today urged the Department of Education to withdraw its proposed “supplement not supplant” regulation, saying it “violates the unambiguously expressed intent of Congress,” and called on the department to instead work with Congress to implement the bipartisan Every Student Succeeds Act as it is written.

The regulatory proposal would change the longstanding requirement that prevents school districts from using federal Title I funds as a replacement for state and local funds in low-income schools.

In comments submitted to Education Secretary John King, the members said the rule “draws broad and inaccurate conclusions about what Congress intended when amending the [‘supplement not supplant’] provision that are not supported by the statutory text and violate clear and unambiguous limitations on the Secretary’s authority.”

The members said certain provisions of the rule are “unlawful, unnecessary and could result in harmful consequences to [local educational agencies], schools, teachers, and students.”

Specifically, the rule dictates to states and local school districts how they should distribute state and local funds, which violates the law and its prohibitions on the Secretary. They write:

In Chevron U.S.A. Inc. v. Natural Resources Defense Council, the U.S. Supreme Court established that the test for reviewing an agency’s interpretation of a statute consists of two related questions. First, the question is “whether Congress has directly spoken to the precise question at issue. If the intent of Congress is clear, that is the end of the matter” because the court and agency must “give effect to the unambiguously expressed intent of Congress.” Second, if “Congress has not directly addressed the precise question at issue” or “if the statute is silent or ambiguous” the question is “whether the agency’s answer is based on a permissible construction of the statute.”

They continue:

The intent of Congress in amending the SNS requirements under Title I of ESEA is clear and unambiguous in directly speaking to the issue of how LEAs must demonstrate compliance. As the Court has held, that should be “the end of the matter” for the Department, which through rulemaking should “give effect to the unambiguously expressed intent of Congress.” Instead, the NPRM violates this principle in imposing new requirements that reflect the Department’s own construction of the statute. We therefore strongly urge the Department to rescind this additional language and work with Congress in a bipartisan, bicameral way to implement ESSA as Congress clearly intended. The following outlines areas of agreement, and then describes the ways in which the Department’s proposal violates the letter and intent of the statute and could lead to negative results for low-income students and schools if it were implemented.

The letter was signed by Senate education committee Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and House Committee on Education and the Workforce Chairman John Kline (R-MN), along with Senate committee members Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Susan Collins (R- ME), Michael B. Enzi (R-WY), Orrin Hatch (R-UT), Johnny Isakson (R-GA), Mark Kirk (R-IL), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Pat Roberts (R-KS), and House committee members Mike Bishop (R-MI), Bradley Byrne (R-AL), Earl L. “Buddy” Carter (R-GA), Carlos Curbelo (R-FL), Virginia Foxx (R-NC), Brett Guthrie (R-KY), Joe Heck (R-NV), Luke Messer (R-IN), Phil Roe (R-TN), Todd Rokita (R-IN), Elise Stefanik (R-NY), Glenn “GT” Thompson (R-PA), Tim Walberg (R-MI), and Joe Wilson (R-SC).

To read the letter, click here.

You don’t have to click on the link, you can read the entire letter below:

Education & Workforce Committee Slam Secretary John King Over Homeschool Remarks

The fun never stops in Washington D.C.  After U.S. Secretary of Education John King said some rather stupid things about homeschooled students yesterday, the House Education and the Workforce Committee thought they should issue a press release on King’s comments.  I have to agree with them!

Education & the Workforce Committee Contact: Press Office
September 23, 2016 (202) 226-9440
Secretary Knows Best?

The Obama administration has always had a “we-know-best” mentality when it comes to K-12 education. The Department of Education has spent years unilaterally dictating education policy through pet projects and conditional waivers. Last year, former Secretary of Education Arne Duncan boasted that the department’s lawyers are “much smarter than many of the folks” working in the United States Congress. And in recent months, the department has put forward new rules that reflect the same old top-down approach to the nation’s classrooms.

Now, Secretary John King is sounding off on parents who decide to homeschool their children. According to Politico Pro:

[Secretary King said] that he’s concerned that homeschooled students aren’t “getting the range of options that are good for all kids” …

[King] said he worries that “students who are homeschooled are not getting kind of the rapid instructional experience they would get in school”—unless parents are “very intentional about it.”

We wonder if the secretary intentionally left out some key facts about the nation’s homeschool students:

  • According to the most recent data, nearly 1.8 million students are homeschooled each year, an increase of over 17 percent since 2007.
  • Homeschool students excel on reading and math tests, scoring in the 89th percentile and 84th percentile, respectively.
  • Students who are homeschooled typically score higher than public school students on standardized tests like the SAT and ACT.
  • As reported by U.S. News and World Report, a study of students at one doctoral university showed homeschooled students “graduated college at a higher rate than their peers—66.7 percent compared to 57.5 percent—and earned higher grade point averages along the way.”

But the secretary knows best, right? Not quite. At a time when the Obama administration was busy setting national education policy, there has been little improvement in student achievement and graduation rates:

  • Only 36 percent of 8th graders are reading at grade level today—a number that remains virtually unchanged since 2009.
  • Only 26 percent of 12th graders are proficient in math—a startling statistic that also has not changed since 2009.
  • One out of every five students is dropping out of school—again, a number that’s largely unchanged since the president took office in 2009.

We all agree that every child deserves to have an excellent education. That’s the reason Republicans and Democrats came together to pass the Every Student Succeeds Act. The law protects homeschools from federal interference and empowers parents to do what they believe is best for their children. Why? Because that’s what is best for America’s students—whether the secretary knows it or not.

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John King Gets Grilled By John Kline Over ESSA Regulations

This morning, United States Secretary of Education John King was once again asked to testify in a hearing before the US House Education and the Workforce Committee.  Chairman John Kline issued a press release:

Kline Statement on Hearing with Secretary of Education King

Rep. John Kline (R-MN), chairman of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, released the following statement after Secretary of Education John King concluded his testimony addressing implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act:

The Every Student Succeeds Act is based on the principle that state and local leaders can run their K-12 schools better than Washington bureaucrats. The law represents the best opportunity we’ve had in decades to provide every child in every school an excellent education. We will not allow the administration to destroy that opportunity by substituting its will for the will of Congress and for the will of our state and local education leaders. This hearing is an important opportunity to hold the administration accountable to those leaders and their students. We appreciate hearing from Secretary King, but in many ways he reinforced our concerns with the troubling direction the department is taking this new law. We will continue to use the tools at our disposal to ensure the letter and intent of the law are strictly followed. Our nation’s parents, teachers, and students deserve nothing less.

Kline also issued his opening statement in the hearing:

Kline Statement: Hearing on “Next Steps in K-12 Education: Examining Recent Efforts to Implement the Every Student Succeeds Act”

Welcome back, Secretary King, and thank you for joining us. When we last met, the process for implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act was just getting underway. We had a healthy discussion about the bipartisan reforms Congress passed and the president signed into law. Those reforms are designed to restore state and local control over K-12 schools.That’s not just my own personal view. It’s the view held by governors, state lawmakers, teachers, parents, principals, and superintendents who recently wrote that, “[The Every Student Succeeds Act] is clear: Education decision-making now rests with states and districts, and the federal role is to support and inform those decisions.” It’s also the view of most honest observers. As the Wall Street Journal editorialized, the law represents the “largest devolution of federal control to the states in a quarter-century.”

That’s not just my own personal view. It’s the view held by governors, state lawmakers, teachers, parents, principals, and superintendents who recently wrote that, “[The Every Student Succeeds Act] is clear: Education decision-making now rests with states and districts, and the federal role is to support and inform those decisions.” It’s also the view of most honest observers. As the Wall Street Journal editorialized, the law represents the “largest devolution of federal control to the states in a quarter-century.”The reason for this hearing and our continued oversight is to ensure the letter and intent of the law are followed. A critical part of our effort is holding your agency accountable, Mr. Secretary, for the steps that are taken to implement the law. When you were with us in February, you said, “You can trust that we will abide by the letter of the law as we move forward …”

That is a strong statement, and it is one of several commitments you’ve made that the department would act responsibly. But actions speak louder than words. In recent months, we have seen troubling signs of the department pulling the country in a different direction than the one Congress provided in the law.

The first troubling sign is the rulemaking process itself. There are a number of concerns about the integrity of the negotiated rulemaking committee, including the makeup of the panel, the lack of rural representation, and the accuracy of statements made by department staff. The point of the negotiated rulemaking process is to build consensus among those directly affected by the law, yet it seems the department decided to stack the deck to achieve its own preferred outcomes.

The second troubling sign surrounds the long-standing policy that federal funds are to supplement, not supplant, state and local resources. Prior to the Every Student Succeeds Act, this rule was applied differently depending on how many low-income students a school served; some schools faced more onerous requirements than others. Last year, Congress decided the rule would be enforced equally across all schools. Now, school districts must simply show that funds are distributed fairly without prescribing a specific approach or outcome. The law explicitly prohibits the secretary from interfering, yet that is precisely what your proposal would do. 

What the department is proposing would be both illegal and harmful to students and communities. It would impose a significant financial burden on states and force countless public school districts to change how they hire and pay their teachers. This regulatory effort is trying to achieve an end Congress deliberately rejected and that the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service warns goes beyond “a plain language reading of the statute.” No doubt you have good intentions, Mr. Secretary, but you do not have the legal authority to do this. I strongly urge you to abandon this flawed scheme.

The third troubling sign is the department’s accountability proposal. Let me note that there are policies in this proposal we are pleased to see, such as how states set long-term goals and measure interim progress. But in a number of ways, we also see the department’s bad habit for making decisions that must be left to states.

This is especially troubling given the law’s explicit prohibitions against federal interference, including how states compare school performance and identify schools for support. For years, states grappled with a rigid accountability system imposed by Washington. The Every Student Succeeds Act turns the page on that failed approach and restores these decisions back to state and local leaders. I urge you, Mr. Secretary, to adopt a final proposal that fully reflects the letter and spirit of the law. 

We are raising these concerns because it’s vitally important for the laws written by Congress to be faithfully executed. And just as importantly, we are raising these concerns because we want to ensure every child has the best chance to receive a quality education. We cannot go back to the days when the federal government dictated national education policy—it didn’t work then and won’t work now.

If the department refuses to follow the letter and intent of the law, you will prevent state leaders, like Dr. Pruitt from Kentucky, from doing what’s right for their school districts. You will deny superintendents, like Dr. Schuler of Arlington Heights, Illinois, the ability to manage schools in a way that meets the needs of their local communities. And you will make it harder for teachers, like Cassie Harrelson from Aurora, Colorado, to serve the best interests of the students in their classrooms.

Later, we will hear from these individuals because they represent the people we want to empower. Every child in every school deserves an excellent education, and the only way to achieve that goal is to restore state and local control. That’s what the Every Student Succeeds Act is intended to do, and we will use every tool at our disposal to ensure the letter and intent of the law are followed.

Delaware Signs Up For Ed-Flex Waiver Schemes Under ESSA

I didn’t expect to find this yesterday, but there it was.  An approval letter from the United States Department of Education to the Delaware DOE about Ed-Flex waivers.  The very thing that the Every Student Succeeds Act was supposed to get rid of.  Instead, we have more of the same.  Using regulations by the feds and the states to keep the level of corruption going well into the next year.  I don’t see the Delaware DOE putting this in their news blasts.  Probably because they want to tuck it away on their website where most of the public wouldn’t even think to look.

ESSAEdFlexDelaware

Is this even legal under the Every Student Succeeds Act?  It most certainly is, but this is another reason I opposed this federal legislation when it came out last November.  It was so enormous in scope that no one could have dissected it enough before the US House and Senate voted on it and President Obama signed it into law on December 10th.  Will US Secretary of Education John King abuse this in his last seven months and a week as the Secretary?  Most assuredly so!  It’s what he does.

ESSAEdFlex

I don’t take these things with a grain of salt.  I see them as very dangerous not only to Delaware education, but education across the United States.  If Delaware is doing this, chances are very good other states are as well.  I’ve already contacted the US House Education and the Workforce Committee Chair John Kline (MN) about this:

Good afternoon members of the Education and the Workforce Committee.

I was very concerned about a letter Secretary of Education John King sent to Delaware Secretary of Education Dr. Steven Godowsky recently concerning “Ed-Flex” states. It authorizes Delaware, under ESSA, to continue to be an Ed-Flex state.  Which is just more waiver schemes.  Didn’t ESSA do away with this?  Here is a link to the letter:  

http://www.doe.k12.de.us/cms/lib09/DE01922744/Centricity/Domain/425/DE%20Ed-Flex%20extension%20letter%206.3.2016.pdf

I find it very disheartening that Secretary King is continuing to justify the very schemes ESSA sought to destroy. Please take a look into this matter and if you could please advise me as to the outcome.

Best regards,

Kevin Ohlandt

Dover, DE

We will see if they respond without some scripted and watered down response.  I’m hoping they take it seriously as John King was called out by Kline on a few occasions the past few months.

US Rep. John Kline Blasts John King Regarding Overreach Of Secretary’s Authority & Transgender Issues

In the latest press release by U.S. Representative John Kline, the Minnesota Republican who also chairs the House Education and the Workforce Committee, Kline tore into US Secretary of Education John King over “guidance” released by the US DOE.  The guidance states

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 13, 2016
CONTACT: Press Office
(202) 226-9440

Kline Statement on New Education Department Guidance

WASHINGTON, D.C. – House Education and the Workforce Committee Chairman John Kline (R-MN) today issued the following statement in response to new Title IX guidance from the Departments of Education and Justice:

These are deeply personal issues that should be discussed and decided openly, where all Americans have an opportunity to express their views and have their voices heard. Unfortunately, once again, the administration is suppressing an important national discussion that belongs to the people. This latest edict disregards the will and concerns of millions of students, parents, teachers, school administrators, and religious leaders. The secretary has the audacity to say this will promote an environment free of fear and discrimination, but what about the students, parents, and families who don’t share the president’s personal views? Let’s be clear about what this is: another unilateral decree imposed on our nation’s schools, colleges, and universities by a lawless administration. The secretary has no business—and certainly no legal authority—denying low-income students the financial support they deserve because their school or institution doesn’t bend to the president’s personal agenda.

So what was the issue surrounding this?  A letter went out today from the United States Department of Justice Civil Rights Division and the US DOE: Dear Colleague Letter 5/13/16

What is your take?  Agree?  Disagree?