Christina School District Salaries Over $100,000

The Christina School District.  They have less administrators than they did four years ago, but they also have over 2,000 less students than they did then.  Much of that can be attributed to the very big charter school growth during that time.  Not only were new charters springing up all over the place, but existing charters expanded their enrollment by adding new grades.  Former Superintendent Freeman Williams resigned in the Fall of 2015 and the district did not get a new Superintendent until the beginning of 2017.  The Delaware DOE and various Delaware Governor’s public education target, Christina has actually come a long way.  Last month they signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Governor Carney and the Delaware Department of Education.  They are taking a strong look at each of their schools, not only in Wilmington but also the Newark/Bear/Glasgow area as well.

I’ve predicted their demise but that was more of a warning shot to them.  Out of all the districts and charters in Delaware, I’ve probably written about them the most.  Which I feel gives me the ability to defend them when the need arises.  The district certainly has their challenges but all districts do.  Christina has some of the highest numbers of low-income and special education students in the entire state.  While they don’t have the highest percentage of low-income students, they have the highest number of students.  And many of those, especially in Wilmington, are students of poverty.  They aren’t the district I’m worried about.  More on that another day.

A very important note about their numbers.  The district itself has 75 administrators making over $100,000.  While that may seem like a lot, they also have over 15,000 students in their district despite the charter explosion in the past decade.  But they also hold special programs in their district, such as the Delaware Autism Program and the Delaware School For The Deaf.  With those programs, the district has 93 administrators making over $100,000.  This is an important distinction which will play out later on.  Four years ago they had 108 administrators hitting the over $100,000 mark.

Christina School District:

30 Schools

14,689 Students

District: 75 Over $100k

Other Programs: 18 Over $100k

*(broken down by district and other programs)

 

DEMOGRAPHICS

African-American: 39.3%

American Indian: .2%

Asian: 5.5%

Hawaiian: .1%

Hispanic Latino: 22.5%

White: 27.5%

Multi-Racial: 4.9%

English Language Learners: 13.7%

Low-Income: 42.9%

Special Education: 20.9%

 

District

Deirdra Aikens, Principal, Leasure, $126,341

Raushann Austin, Principal, Pulaski, $120,736

Dionne Bartley-Avant, Assistant Principal, Gauger-Cobbs, $113,883

James Baustert, Manager, Facilities Services, $116,842

Curtis Bedford, Supervisor Professional Development, $134,758

Natalie Birch, Principal, Wilson, $122,325

Jeffers Brown, Principal, Stubbs, $127,825

Heather Buchanan, Assistant Principal, Keene, $118,509

Vilicia Cade, Senior Director, Secondary Education, $146,083

Victoir Cahoon, Principal, Bayard, $134,896

Shevena Cale, Principal, Jones, $123,413

Erin Cassel, Principal, Gallaher, $119,647

Dana Crumlish, Supervisor, Student Services, $127,143

Kristin DeGregory, Assistant Principal, Newark H.S., $122,314

Marilyn Dollard, Principal, Oberle, $134,139

Bartley Dryden, Principal, Maclary, $128,695

Nakia Fambro, Assistant Principal, Glasgow H.S., $119,064

Brandie Foxx, Assistant Principal, Gallaher, $111,413

Jacqueline Gallagher, Assistant Principal, Brader, $111,663

Jeanette Ganc, Principal, Brader, $122,575

Garcia Garnett Jr., Supervisor, Transportation Services, $127,643

Mable (Mae) Gaskins, Principal, Jennie Smith, $123,075

Christine Getugi, Assistant Principal, Christiana H.S., $114,113

Denise Glover, Supervisor, Business Services, $128,270

Krystal Greenfield, Assistant Principal, Bayard, $122,314

Richard Gregg, Superintendent, $180,000 (four years ago former Superintendent Freeman Williams’ salary was $182,076 with an additional $10,011 in other compensation for a total of $192,088)

Ledonnis Hernandez, Principal, West Park Place, $120,736

Catherine Herring, Assistant Principal, Christiana H.S., $113,855

Harold (Butch) Ingram Jr., Principal, Bancroft, $130,841

Dean Ivory, Principal, Glasgow H.S., $128,770

Patricia (Elaine) Jefferson, Assistant Principal, Shue-Medill, $116,206

Robert Jefferson, Assistant Principal, Gauger-Cobbs, $121,637

Philip Keefer, Supervisor, State & Federal Programs, $125,141

Karen Keller, Director, Human Resources, $133,700

Norman Kennedy III, Principal, Kirk, $127,729

Dolores (DeeJay) Kingery, Assistant Principal, Bancroft, $122,009

Amy Kohan, Assistant Principal, Kirk, $118,419

Nicholas Koski-Vacirca, Manager, Facilities Services, $116,992

Wendy Lapham, Manager, Public Information, $116,842

Jennifer Lapin, Supervisor Assessment, Research & Evaluation, $128,393

Noreen Lasorsa, Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum, Instruction & Assessment, $156,668

Brian Lee, Assistant Principal, Leasure, $119,009

John Lynch III, Assistant Principal, Jennie Smith, $119,259

Kristina MacBury, Principal, Sarah Pyle Academy, $132,221

Daphne Mathews, Administrator, Adult Education, $125,891

Edward Mayfield, Assistant to Superintendent, Director Operations, $143,800

Gina Moody, Principal, Elbert-Palmer, $134,513

Sean Mulrine, Principal, Gauger-Cobbs, $123,479

Tracy Novack, Assistant Principal, Marshall, $120,231

Kevin Ohlandt, Unofficial Blog Writer for District, $0.00

James Osgood, Assistant Principal, Christina Early Childhood Center, $120,495

Gaurang Pathak, Financial Manager, Procurement, $116,992

Donald Patton, Administrator Special Assignment, $124,891

Demeter Picciotti, Manager, Facilities Services, $116,992

Samuel Postlethwait, Principal, Christiana H.S., $128,270

Patricia Prettyman, Principal, Downes, $125,591

Charles Priestly, Assistant Principal, Shue-Medill, $119,064

Rebecca Reggio, Assistant Principal, Newark H.S., $126,002

Rella Reynolds, Assistant Principal, Oberle, $113,440

Rebecca Ryan, Principal, Christina Early Childhood Center, $121,825

Michele Savage, Principal, Shue-Medill, $121,137

Michael Scott, Assistant Principal, Glasgow H.S., $121,137

Aaron Selekman, Principal, Newark H.S., $134,520

Amy Selheimer, Principal, Marshall, $120,564

Robert Sharkey, Manager, Facilities Services, $116,842

Robert Silber, Assistant Superintendent, Chief Financial Officer, $149,168

Timothy Slade, Assistant Principal, Newark H.S., $124,887

Andrea Solge, Supervisor, Child Nutrition Services, $124,741

Celeste Sosa-Vann, Assistant Principal, Pulaski, $118,759

Eric Stephens, Principal, Brookside, $125,841

Mariellen Taraboletti, Principal, Keene, $120,736

Josette Tucker, Senior Director, Human Resources, $141,083

Robert Vacca, Supervisor, Payroll, $126,993

George Wicks, Supervisor, Planning & Facilities, $126,993

David Wilkie, Principal, McVey, $123,413

Whitney Williams, Supervisor, Parent & Community, $129,270

 

Christina School District CEEC Reach ILC & Networks Programs

Norma Brister, Principal, Networks School, $125,391

Jill Casey, Principal, REACH, $120,736

Melissa Henry, Assistant Principal, REACH, $112,427

Tara Needam, Supervisor, Special Services, $124,891

Elizabeth O’Hare, Administrator, Special Services, $122,064

 

Delaware Autism Program

Michael Andrews, Assistant Principal, Ext. Services, Brennen, $116,481

Jennifer Brown, Assistant Principal, Brennen, $118,028

Heather Calkins, Assistant Principal, Brennen, $117,745

Jeffrey Conkey, Principal, Brennen, $125,141

Alexis Hackett, Assistant Principal, Brennen, $115,986

Pamela Padovani, Assistant Principal, Brennen, $120,350

Vincent Winterling, Statewide Director, $134,450

 

Delaware School For The Deaf

Mark Campano, Coordinator State Programs Deaf-Blind, $121,825

Courtney Cooper, School Leader, $111,413

Eva Hartmann, Dean of Students, $119,759

Tara Kelly, School Leader, FACES, $113,440

Laurie Kettle-Rivera, Interim Director/Coordinator Statewide, $134,902

Daphne Werner, Secondary School Leader, $114,704

9 thoughts on “Christina School District Salaries Over $100,000

  1. Easy Peasy Answer. Those are state and federal funds supplemented by our fancy schmacey TUITION TAX dollars – the tax that voters don’t actually get to vote on… it’s raised and lowered every July or August based on the IEPS of the students served therein. And yes, some years, in CSD, the tuition tax been lowered. It’s minutia but would be unfair to not disclose the full truth.

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    • But Christina gets the tuition tax portion from districts that sends their kids to those special programs, correct? For example, if an Appo student goes to DAP, Appo sends that funding to Christina. And I believe the Delaware DOE has to approve all of those payments.

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      • I’m going to try and be clear and just use DAP as the example in the explanation.

        There are special programs that have been created through state legislature. DAP was one such program. It was embedded in CSD for the purpose of handling its business office and a few other reasons that are pretty much non-issues today. CSD is the financial custodian for DAP. DAP earned it’s own unit count based on the IEPs of the children served therein. CSD does the hiring, firing, and billing, and bill paying for DAP as part of its duties. The state approves the billing formula, approves the bills, and sends them to the sending district. Christina actually receives tuition bill from DAP. Because DAP is its own little entity, the chief financial officer makes an e-transfer from CSD to pay the bill to DAP. CSD knows how many of its children attend DAP via the in-district IEP process. Thus, when the district needs to calculate tuition tax, CSD has the pertinent numbers needed to adjust the DAP’s share of the tuition tax. Sending districts have this same data as it pertains to their districts and set their own tuition rates. Red Clay pays it’s bill to DAP where it is electronically managed by CSD.

        I can’t stress enough these are statewide programs, created through legislation and embedded in CSD in a way that saves the tax payers money because the programs do not have their own business offices and the salaries that accompany such staff. CSD acts as their custodian. It does NOT inter-mingle funds. However, it has loaned programs funding when sending districts are neglectful of sending their payments.

        The system, however, has not always been perfect and still isn’t. That’s not CSD’s fault. DOE tells them what to do. One year several sending districts disputed their bills and waited until the CSD board issued very strong guidance on the future acceptance of their students and notification of sending parents. During the standoff, the special program ran low on funds and CSD stepped in to loan the program money. It was fully repaid. As another example, A long long time ago, Christina tax payers fully funded the residences for DAP – DOE did not include the cost of the residences in the bill. Therefore, districts that sent a student for a short-term stay at the residences were paying nada. The big secret is that CSD tax payers paid for those stays for ages until the formula was changed at CSD’s request about 8 years back. From my experience an the long-dismissed DAP task force for future growth, a group of education leaders and parents that met several times 10-12 years ago, some of these funding details were oversights that resulted from a program growing exponentially across the state. The residential issue stems from the fact that DAP in NCCo was/is the only location of residential units. Billing practices and guidance from DOE happened much slower than the speed of growth. There is one more point I want to share – I believe the staffing ratios, including what appears to be an excessive allotment of vice principals – is explained in state code. I can’t provide a more current view as I have not had much contact with the DAP for several years. But, I hope this provides a more complete picture of the operations of special programs in general.

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