Sneak Peak: Return to the Kingdom of Del, A Tale Of Christina #netde #eduDE @KilroysDelaware @ed_in_de

While Jon was dealing with his issues in the county of Kent, far away in the Kingdom of Del, up north and past the canal, lived a very special child in the county of Novus Castrum.  Within the walls of Novus Castrum, there were several districts, and the largest of them was Christina.  Many schools were housed within these borders, and many citizens of the Kingdom of Del lived in this area.  There were many schools for parents to choose, so the area became known for it’s many public schools and charter schools.  For the little girl named Maria, the choice was not so simple for her parents.  Maria’s loving mother and father knew she was very different from many of the other children her age.  You see, Maria was diagnosed as autistic.

This is the story of Maria’s journey, which isn’t over yet.  While Maria didn’t attend a charter school like Jon did, she did attend many different schools.  This is a story of impossible choices for Maria’s parents, Maria’s struggles, neglect, communication, and tragedy.  Maria and Jon have some things in common.  They were both children of the kingdom who lived their life with disabilities.   The tales are very similar, yet vastly different.  Words like inspection, fape, dap, special education, feeder, and communication all are very important to Maria’s story.  It’s a story of two parents attempts to get the best services for their daughter who had a very difficult disability and needed extra care and support.  Did she receive that?

To Be Continued….

Statistics and Parenting

As special needs parents, we are told things all the time. But nobody knows our children better than we do. We can get guidance and support, but at the end of the day, we know best for what makes our children who and what they are.

Emma's Hope Book

Fear.  I have grappled with fear my entire life.  I’m 54 years old.   You’d think I’d have figured out a magic formula to ward off fear by now…  but I have not.  However I have figured out some things that used to frighten me, but that no longer do.  Things like this:

“Among all autistics, 75 percent are expected to score in the mentally retarded range on standard intelligence tests — that’s an IQ of 70 or less.” ~ Wired Magazine 2008

“Roughly 25 percent of people with autism speak few or no words.” ~ SFARI 2013

These two quotes had not yet been written when my daughter was diagnosed, instead there were countless other “statistics” spoken and/or written as though fact, that terrified me.  I had not yet learned to question everything we were told about autism.  I had not yet realized that almost everything people said to us about autism…

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* Rubrics #3 Teaching social skills

This is an excellent blog from the perspective of a special education teacher. She knows her stuff! Social skills training is becoming more popular, and the trick to it is consistency. Well done!

Teachezwell Blog

This is my third post on the use of rubrics for instruction and assessment.  In this post I will review some effective ways to use rubrics for students who struggle with social skills.  Many of these student have been labeled as autistic (on the autism spectrum or as having a Pervasive Developmental Disorder).

Rubrics fit well into explicit and sequential instruction in social skills.  (Hey! Just as in phonics instruction!)   Using a case study approach, let me introduce you to Jonathan.  He was identified as having PDD in preschool.  He’s a bright kid who looks a lot like a miniature “professor.”  Jonathan is very rule-oriented and eager to please.  He is easily distracted by sounds and movement around him and is on medication for a diagnosed attention disorder.  He appears to be daydreaming much of the time.

When I first observed Jonathan in his classroom, he was sitting quietly but…

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